Night at the Mouseion

amnhnyc:

A diorama in the Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs exhibition brings to life a scene from the Romualdo Formation from a time when pterosaurs ruled the skies and hunted for fish along an ancient coast.
Curators created the scene based on fossils found at the Araripe Basin in Brazil. Many are beautifully preserved, immediately recognizable as the animals they once were. The fossils are also of particular geological interest because they date from a time—110 million years ago—when the continents weren’t in the same positions as they are today. South America was only starting to split off from Africa, and a north-south seaway may have run down through today’s Brazil, including through the Romualdo. 
Learn more about this prehistoric scene.

amnhnyc:

A diorama in the Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs exhibition brings to life a scene from the Romualdo Formation from a time when pterosaurs ruled the skies and hunted for fish along an ancient coast.

Curators created the scene based on fossils found at the Araripe Basin in Brazil. Many are beautifully preserved, immediately recognizable as the animals they once were. The fossils are also of particular geological interest because they date from a time—110 million years ago—when the continents weren’t in the same positions as they are today. South America was only starting to split off from Africa, and a north-south seaway may have run down through today’s Brazil, including through the Romualdo. 

Learn more about this prehistoric scene.

lostbeasts:

rhamphotheca:

High-School Student Finds Bumpy-Headed Baby Dino

by Stephanie Pappas

A dinosaur skeleton discovered by an eagle-eyed high-school student turns out to be the smallest, youngest and most complete duck-billed dinosaur of its kind ever found.

This Cretaceous-era herbivore, Parasaurolophus, walked the Earth some 75 million years ago. The dinosaurs in this genus are best known for their impressive tube-shaped head crests, which may have been used for display or perhaps to amplify the animals’ calls. The little specimen, dubbed “Joe,” was so young that its crest was a mere bump on its head.

"We now understand a lot more about how Parasaurolophus grew its crest,” said Andrew Farke, a paleontologist and curator at Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology in Claremont, Calif…

(read more: Live Science)

photos : Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology

oh my goddd ;U;

(via hoioligoi)